Register for updates

 
 

Biology & Evolution
RSS Feed
Bat Calls Contain Wealth of Discernible Information
Tuesday, December 27, 2016 9:00:00 AM

Analyzing some 15,000 bat vocalizations, TAU researchers identify speakers, objectives and contexts of bat conversations

Bats, like humans, are extremely social mammals. They enjoy an average lifespan of 20-30 years, settle in large colonies, and rely heavily on social interactions for their survival, using vocalizations — or calls — for communication. There is very little known about the purpose and content of these noises.

A new Tel Aviv University study published in Scientific Reports extracts critical information from bat vocalizations to offer a rare, informative look into the world of bat communication. The new research, led by Prof. Yossi Yovel of the Department of Zoology at TAU's Faculty of Life Sciences, delves into the veritable cacophony emitted by bats to identify concrete evidence of a socially sophisticated species that learns communication, rather than being born with a fixed set of communication skills.

"When you enter a bat cave, you hear a lot of 'gibberish,' a cacophony of aggressive bat noise – but is this merely 'shouting' or is there information amid the noise?" said Prof. Yovel. "Previous research presumed that most bat communication was based on screaming and shouting. We wanted to know how much information was actually conveyed — and we wanted to see if we could, in fact, extract that information."

For the purpose of the research, Mor Taub and Yosef Prat, students in Prof. Yovel's lab, recorded the sounds emitted by 22 Egyptian fruit bats in TAU's "bat cave" over the course of 75 days. The authors then assembled a dataset of approximately 15,000 vocalizations, which represented the full vocal repertoire the bats used during the experiment. By analyzing this dataset, the authors found that the vocalizations contained information about the identity of the bat emitting the call and even about the identity of the bat being addressed by the call. Moreover, while most of this species' vocalizations were emitted during aggressive encounters, by analyzing the spectral composition of the calls, the authors were also able to distinguish their specific aggressive context (such as squabbling over food, sleeping spots or other resources).

"Studying how much information is conveyed in animal communication is important if you're interested in the evolution of human language," said Prof. Yovel. "Specifically, one big unknown in the world of animal communication is their grasp on semanticity — i.e., when you hear the word 'apple' you immediately imagine a round, red fruit. We found, in our research, that bat calls contain information about the identities of the caller and the addressee, which implies that there is a recognition factor. We were also able to discern the purpose and the context of the conversation, as well as the possible outcome of the 'discussion.'"

Due to the difficulty of cataloguing animal calls, these vocalizations are often grouped into one category in acoustic studies. According to Prof. Yovel, the new findings suggest that delving into animal calls could serve a bigger purpose, shedding light on the evolution of communication altogether.

"We generated a massive amount of data — dozens of calls over three months," said Prof. Yovel. "We have found that bats fight over sleeping positions, over mating, over food or just for the sake of fighting. To our surprise, we were able to differentiate between all of these contexts in complete darkness, and we are confident bats themselves are able to identify even more information and with greater accuracy — they are, after all, an extremely social species that live with the same neighbors for dozens of years."

The researchers were even able to identify different intonations indicating the greetings of a "friend" or a "foe."

"The last finding allowed us to predict whether the two would stay together or part, whether the interaction would end well or badly," said Prof. Yovel, who is currently researching different bat accents and the assimilation of bats into different social groups.




Latest News

Zuckerman Scholar Launches State-of-the-Art Laser Laboratory at TAU

Dr. Ishay Pomerantz hopes to lower the cost and size of particle accelerators for more practical social applications.

The Brain Mechanism Behind Multitasking

The brief reactivation of a learned memory can block interference from competing tasks, TAU researchers say.

DNA Delivery Technology Joins Battle Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria

New tool is major milestone against lethal condition, TAU researchers say.

Cardiac Stem Cells from Heart Disease Patients May Be Harmful

TAU researchers discover molecular pathway involved in toxic interaction between host cells and immune system.

Multispectral Imaging Reveals Ancient Hebrew Inscription Undetected for Over 50 Years

Military correspondence from the First Temple period discovered on reverse side of well-studied artifact at The Israel Museum, TAU researchers say.

Earliest Human Impact on the Environment Took Place 11,500 Years Ago

The earliest geological indication of humans' impact on the environment discovered in the Dead Sea, TAU researchers say.

IDEAS Immersion Program to Host Nine Female Entrepreneurs from TAU

Acceleration program partners with Cross Campus and Google to help budding women entrepreneurs incubate startups.

Prof. Jacob A. Frenkel Elected to Second Term as Chairman of TAU's Board of Governors

Internationally-acclaimed economist will continue to "greatly contribute to the further development of Tel Aviv University," said TAU President Prof. Yossi Klafter.

Solving the Riddle of the Snow Globe

TAU research explains the process of sedimentation in natural and industrial contexts.

TAU Bestows Honorary Doctorate on Pouran Toufer Nazarian

University's highest honor recognizes Iranian philanthropist and visionary.

A Glow Stick That Detects Cancer?

TAU researchers devise a novel probe to identify and measure microscopic cell activity.

TAU Study Links Cannabis Use in Adolescence to Schizophrenia

Psychoactive compound in cannabis may trigger the brain disorder, researchers say.

Violent Attacks Against Jews Declined 12% in 2016, But Anti-Semitic Hate Speech Spiked

U.S. college campuses saw a 45% rise in anti-Semitism of all forms, annual TAU Kantor Center study reports.

Israeli Student Film Sets Guinness World Record

Lior Geller's Roads noted for most awards won by a short student film.

contentSecondary
c

© 2017 American Friends of Tel Aviv University
39 Broadway, Suite 1510 | New York, NY 10006 | 212.742.9070 | info@aftau.org
Privacy policy | Tel Aviv University