Register for updates

 
 

Business & Management
RSS Feed
Binge Drinking in College May Lower Chances of Landing a Job After College
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 9:00:00 AM

Drinking habits, not drinking itself, may impact future careers, say TAU, Cornell University researchers

Heavy drinking six times a month reduces the probability that a new college graduate will land a job by 10 percent, according to Tel Aviv University and Cornell University research published in the Journal of Applied Psychology.

Previous studies were unable to determine the precise effect of alcohol consumption on first-time employment. But according to the new study, each individual episode of student binge-drinking during a month-long period lowers the odds of attaining full-time employment upon graduation by 1.4 percent.

"The manner in which students drink appears to be more influential than how much they drink when it comes to predicting the likelihood of getting a job upon graduation," says Prof. Peter Bamberger of TAU's Coller School of Business Management and Cornell University, who co-authored the study with Prof. Samuel Bacharach of Cornell University; Prof. Mary Larimer and Prof. Irene Geisner, both of the University of Washington; Jacklyn Koopmann of Auburn University; Prof. Inbal Nahum-Shani of the University of Michigan; and Prof. Mo Wang of the University of Florida.

"Binge-drinking" is defined as ingesting four or more alcoholic drinks within two hours by a woman and five or more alcoholic drinks within two hours by a man, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

How often, not how much

The research found that a non-binge pattern of drinking does not adversely impact job search results unless and until their drinking reaches binge levels.

Data for the study was provided by 827 individuals who graduated in 2014, 2015, and 2016 from Cornell, the University of Washington, the University of Florida, and the University of Michigan.

"A student who binge-drinks four times a month has a 6 percent lower probability of finding a job than a student who does not engage in similar drinking habits. Those students who drank heavily six times a month increased their unemployment probability to 10 percent," says Prof. Bamberger.

Funded by a $2.2 million grant from the National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, the research is the first installment of a longitudinal study on how alcohol misuse affects the college-to-work transition. More than 16,000 individuals have been contacted as part of the five-year study.

"This paper is consistent with the recent emphasis on the impact of drinking behavior on career transition from Cornell's Smithers Institute," said Prof. Bacharach. "It is in concert with the previous work we've done on retirement, and on-boarding [the entry and socialization of newcomers into an organization]. Most importantly, it is also consistent with the Smithers Institute's continued programmatic interest in substance abuse not only in the workplace, but in the college community as well."




Latest News

Turning Brain Cells into Skin Cells

TAU and Weizmann Institute researchers transform mature cells from the brain, heart and more into skin cells.

Gravitational Waves Detected Following Collision of Neutron Stars 120 Million Light Years Away

TAU utilizes Nobel-winning research to expand understanding of the universe.

TAU and the University of Notre Dame Sign Cooperative Agreement for Academic Exchange and Collaboration

Leading institutions in Israel and US sign memorandum of understanding; Endowment Fund established to support international collaboration.

Fever During Labor May Present Risk to Mother

Intrapartum fever triggered by bacterial infection may cause neonatal complications, TAU researchers say.

Binge Drinking in College May Lower Chances of Landing a Job After College

Drinking habits, not drinking itself, may impact future careers, say TAU, Cornell University researchers.

A New Alternative to "Practice Makes Perfect"

Brief reactivations of visual memories are enough to complete a full learning curve, TAU researchers say.

IDEAS Immersion Program to Host Six Startups from TAU in Chicago

Acceleration program partners with Chicago's 1871 Center for Technology and Entrepreneurship to help budding entrepreneurs incubate startups.

Citrus: From Luxury Item to Cash Crop

Citrus fruits were the clear status symbols of the nobility in the ancient Mediterranean, TAU researcher says.

A Social Aspect to the Inheritance of Differing Behaviors of Men and Women

New study from Melbourne, Exeter and Tel Aviv Universities suggests gender-specific behaviors can be inherited from social environment, not just from genetics.

Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Stress Drugs Taken Prior to Surgery May Reduce Metastatic Recurrence

The body's stress inflammatory response is an active agent of cancer metastasis, TAU researchers say.

contentSecondary
c

© 2017 American Friends of Tel Aviv University
39 Broadway, Suite 1510 | New York, NY 10006 | 212.742.9070 | info@aftau.org
Privacy policy | Tel Aviv University