Register for updates

 
 

Computers & Technology
RSS Feed
New Smartwatch Software May Now Verify Your Signatures
Monday, January 30, 2017 9:00:00 AM

Software measuring wrist movements could replace tablets and digital pens, say TAU and Ben-Gurion University researchers

The handwritten signature is still the most widely accepted biometric used to verify a person's identity. Banks, corporations, and government bodies rely on the human eye and digital devices such as tablets or smart pens to capture, analyse, and verify people's autographs.

New software developed by researchers at Tel Aviv University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev now enables smartwatches, currently worn by one in six people around the world, to verify handwritten signatures.

The accompanying study was recently published on arXiv. It is available at https://arxiv.org/abs/1612.06305.

"A popular device worn by so many people should feature additional, critically useful functions," said study co-author Dr. Erez Shmueli of TAU's Department of Industrial Engineering, who added that 373 million of these devices will be in use by 2020. "Considering how dependent we are on signatures, we decided to develop software that would verify the smartwatch device wearer's handwritten signature."

The next step in signature verification

Signing on a digital pad or using a special electronic pen has replaced pen and paper in many instances, but these alternatives often require cumbersome dedicated devices. The new software developed by Dr. Shmueli and his student Alona Levy, in collaboration with Prof. Yuval Elovici of BGU's Department of Software and Information Systems Engineering and his student Ben Nassi, would turn any generic smartwatch into an expert signature verifier.

The novel technology utilizes motion data — a person's wrist movements measured by an accelerometer or a gyroscope — to uniquely identify them during the signing process and subsequently classify the signature as either genuine or forged.

"Using a wrist-worn device such as a smartwatch or a fitness tracker bears obvious advantages over other wearable devices, since it measures the gestures of the entire wrist rather than a single finger or an arm," said Dr. Shmueli. "While several other recent studies have examined the option of using motion data to identify users, this is its first application to verify handwritten signatures — still a requirement at the bank, the post office, your human resources department, etc."

Fighting forgery

The team tested its system on 66 TAU undergraduates. The students, all wearing smartwatches, were asked to provide 15 signature samples on a tablet, using the tablet's digital pen. The students were then shown video recordings of people signing during the first phase, and were asked to forge five of those signatures. The students were given ample time to practice and were compensated for "exceptional forgeries."

The smartwatch, equipped with the new verification software, was able to detect forgery with an extremely high level of accuracy.

"Next we plan to compare our approach with existing state-of-the-art methods for offline and online signature verification," said Dr. Shmueli. "We would also like to investigate the option of combining data extracted from the wearable device with data collected from a tablet device to achieve even higher verification accuracy."

The researchers have applied for a patent in an initial step toward commercializing their system.




Latest News

Zuckerman Scholar Launches State-of-the-Art Laser Laboratory at TAU

Dr. Ishay Pomerantz hopes to lower the cost and size of particle accelerators for more practical social applications.

The Brain Mechanism Behind Multitasking

The brief reactivation of a learned memory can block interference from competing tasks, TAU researchers say.

DNA Delivery Technology Joins Battle Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria

New tool is major milestone against lethal condition, TAU researchers say.

Cardiac Stem Cells from Heart Disease Patients May Be Harmful

TAU researchers discover molecular pathway involved in toxic interaction between host cells and immune system.

Multispectral Imaging Reveals Ancient Hebrew Inscription Undetected for Over 50 Years

Military correspondence from the First Temple period discovered on reverse side of well-studied artifact at The Israel Museum, TAU researchers say.

Earliest Human Impact on the Environment Took Place 11,500 Years Ago

The earliest geological indication of humans' impact on the environment discovered in the Dead Sea, TAU researchers say.

IDEAS Immersion Program to Host Nine Female Entrepreneurs from TAU

Acceleration program partners with Cross Campus and Google to help budding women entrepreneurs incubate startups.

Prof. Jacob A. Frenkel Elected to Second Term as Chairman of TAU's Board of Governors

Internationally-acclaimed economist will continue to "greatly contribute to the further development of Tel Aviv University," said TAU President Prof. Yossi Klafter.

Solving the Riddle of the Snow Globe

TAU research explains the process of sedimentation in natural and industrial contexts.

TAU Bestows Honorary Doctorate on Pouran Toufer Nazarian

University's highest honor recognizes Iranian philanthropist and visionary.

A Glow Stick That Detects Cancer?

TAU researchers devise a novel probe to identify and measure microscopic cell activity.

TAU Study Links Cannabis Use in Adolescence to Schizophrenia

Psychoactive compound in cannabis may trigger the brain disorder, researchers say.

Violent Attacks Against Jews Declined 12% in 2016, But Anti-Semitic Hate Speech Spiked

U.S. college campuses saw a 45% rise in anti-Semitism of all forms, annual TAU Kantor Center study reports.

Israeli Student Film Sets Guinness World Record

Lior Geller's Roads noted for most awards won by a short student film.

contentSecondary
c

© 2017 American Friends of Tel Aviv University
39 Broadway, Suite 1510 | New York, NY 10006 | 212.742.9070 | info@aftau.org
Privacy policy | Tel Aviv University