Register for updates

 
 

Medicine & Health
RSS Feed
New Treatment Triggers Self-Destruction of Pancreatic Cancer Cells
Monday, December 02, 2019 9:00:00 AM

Research conducted on human pancreatic tumors transplanted in mice reveals promising results, TAU researchers say

Pancreatic cancer is resistant to all current treatments. Patients have extremely poor chances of surviving for five years after being diagnosed.

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a small molecule has the ability to induce the self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells. The research was conducted with xenografts — transplantations of human pancreatic cancer into immunocompromised mice. The treatment reduced the number of cancer cells by 90% in the developed tumors a month after being administered.

The research holds great potential for the development of a new effective therapy to treat this aggressive cancer in humans.

The study was led by Prof. Malca Cohen-Armon and her team at TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine, in collaboration with Dr. Talia Golan's team at the Cancer Research Center at Sheba Medical Center. It was published in the journal Oncotarget on October 22.

"In research published in 2017, we discovered a mechanism that causes the self-destruction of human cancer cells during their duplication (mitosis) without affecting normal cells," explains Prof. Cohen-Armon. "We have now harnessed this information to efficiently eradicate human pancreatic cancer cells in xenografts. The current results were obtained using a small molecule that evokes this self-destruction mechanism in a variety of human cancer cells.

"The mice were treated with a molecule called PJ34, which is permeable in the cell membrane but affects human cancer cells exclusively. This molecule causes an anomaly during the duplication of human cancer cells, provoking their rapid cell death. Thus, cell multiplication itself resulted in cell death in the treated cancer cells."

A month after being injected with PJ34 daily for 14 days, the pancreatic cancer cells in the tumors of the treated mice experienced a relative drop of 90%. In one mouse, the tumor completely disappeared.

"It is important to note that no adverse effects were observed, and there were no changes in the weight gain of the mice, nor in their behavior," says Prof. Cohen-Armon.

This mechanism acts efficiently in other types of cancer resistant to current therapies. The molecule PJ34 is being tested in pre-clinical trials according to FDA regulations before clinical trials begin.

The research was funded through contributions to American Friends of Tel Aviv University.




Latest News

Study Reveals Two Writers Penned Landmark Inscriptions in Eighth-Century BCE Samaria

Discovery illuminates bureaucratic apparatus of ancient kingdom of Israel, say TAU researchers.

Siblings of Children With Intellectual Disabilities Score High on Empathy, Teaching and Closeness

TAU research indicates positive relationship between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities.

Fibroblasts Involved in Healing Spur Tumor Growth in Cancer

Vital to healing wounds, fibroblasts have a "misguided" response to cancer cells, according to TAU researchers.

TAU Study Finds Widespread Misinterpretation of Gene Expression Data

But bias can be removed from data to filter out false results, researchers say.

Made a "Dumb" Move? New Studies Say a Neuronal Mechanism Is to Blame

TAU, Hebrew University research finds a neuronal mechanism explains much of our irrational behavior.

Tiny Insects Become "Visible" to Bats When They Swarm

3-D simulations could provide new insights into the evolution of bat echolocation, TAU researchers say.

AFTAU Earns 4-Star Rating from Charity Navigator for Seventh Consecutive Year

Charity Navigator's highest rating indicates the nonprofit exceeds industry standards and outperforms other organizations.

TAU Partners with Columbia University to Launch Dual Degree Program

Israeli university's first-ever joint undergraduate program with an Ivy League university offers students a world-class liberal arts education on two continents.

TAU’s Prof. Ilan Tsarfaty Awarded Breast Cancer Research Foundation Grant

BCRF granted $66 million in funding to 275 scientists at institutions worldwide in 2019.

TAU's Prof. Carmit Levy Receives Young Investigator Award at Society for Melanoma Research Summit

Researcher honored for major contributions to the field of melanoma research.

contentSecondary
c

© 2020 American Friends of Tel Aviv University
39 Broadway, Suite 1510 | New York, NY 10006 | 212.742.9070 | info@aftau.org
Privacy policy | Tel Aviv University