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Now there’s proof: Sexist men have unsatisfying relationships

A new Tel Aviv University study provides scientific confirmation that men who hold sexist views of women feel threatened by them and are more likely to have unsatisfying relationships. The study, led by Dr. Orly Bareket of TAU’s School of Psychological Sciences and published in the journal Sex Roles, was based on an online questionnaire… Read More

Your stress and mine

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that people often project their own experiences with stress onto their colleagues and employees, causing miscommunication and, often, missed opportunities. “This study is the first to show that our own psychological mindset determines how we judge other peoples’ responses to stress — specifically, whether we perceive stress as… Read More

Binge drinking in college may lower chances of landing a job after college

Heavy drinking six times a month reduces the probability that a new college graduate will land a job by 10 percent, according to Tel Aviv University and Cornell University research published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. Previous studies were unable to determine the precise effect of alcohol consumption on first-time employment. But according to… Read More

A new alternative to “practice makes perfect”

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that brief memory reactivations can replace repeated extensive practice and training — commonly known as “practice makes perfect” — as a basis of procedural learning. “Instead of bombarding our brain with repeated practice and training, people can utilize our new framework and improve learning with only several brief… Read More

The brain mechanism behind multitasking

Although “multitasking” is a popular buzzword, research shows that only 2% of the population actually multitasks efficiently. Most of us just shift back and forth between different tasks, a process that requires our brains to refocus time and time again — and reduces overall productivity by a whopping 40%. New Tel Aviv University research identifies… Read More

Violent attacks against Jews declined 12% in 2016, but anti-Semitic hate speech spiked

Anti-Semitic violence around the world dropped 12%, from 410 incidents in 2015 to 361 incidents in 2016. But anti-Semitism on U.S. college campuses increased 45%, and the incidence of anti-Semitic hate speech, particularly online, rose dramatically worldwide, according to the annual report by Tel Aviv University‘s Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry,… Read More

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